Social Media in the Sciences

The science community at Brandeis University has been active in the getting information out about our research, events and achievements. The many forms of social media have been instrumental in getting this word out.

Blogs

While the Science at Brandeis blog strives to provide information about all of the programs and departments in the Division of Science, some of the other blogs focus on a specific program or area of research. Fly on the Wall provides interesting reviews of recent fly science research and publications. Physics at Brandeis focuses on Physics-related news, events and research. Science Whys is a blog created by James Morris, assistant professor of Biology at Brandeis. It is comprised of essays on science, teaching and medicine. The sidebar at right lists some of the most recent posts for these four blogs.

Twitter

For quick science-related updates on twitter follow us on our Brandeis science and Brandeis Life Science twitter accounts.

Science Blogs at Brandeis

  • Science at Brandeis
  • Fly on the Wall
  • Physics at Brandeis
  • Science Whys

Almost all our cells harbor a sensory organelle called the primary cilium, homologous to the better known flagella found in protists. Some of these cilia can beat and allow the cell to move (eg. in sperm), or move fluid (eg. cerebrospinal fluid) around them. However, other specialized cilia such as [...]

Metal-metal interactions are at the heart of some of the most interesting metal-catalyzed transformations and are found everywhere from Nature (metalloenzymes) to industrially important heterogeneous catalysis (surfaces, nanomaterials).  While textbooks have been written about metal-metal multiple b [...]

In recognition of his contribution to the study of oscillating chemical reactions, Irving Epstein, the Henry F. Fischbach Professor of Chemistry, has been selected as a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Epstein, who in his 45 years at Brandeis has served as Pr [...]

Imagine you’re a fly buzzing through the forest looking for something to eat, and you happen upon a sweet fruit that tastes bitter. What’s a fly to do? A sweet fruit is a nutritious meal, but the bitter taste implies toxins. In a recent paper by French et al. in the Journal of Neuroscience, research [...]

At universities and companies around the world, scientists are studying the mechanisms of cancer and tumors using fruit flies. They hope to identify failures in the genes that lead to cancer, and develop treatments to prevent or reverse these problems. Because approximately 60% of the genes associat [...]

When you walk outside into sweltering heat or biting cold, your body responds by sweating or shivering to regulate body temperature. It starts with cells in your skin called thermoreceptor neurons, which sense the temperature of your environment and send that information to the brain for processing. [...]

Written by Jena Pitman-Leung. The Division of Science Graduate Affairs group hosted the 2nd annual Brandeis University Undergraduate Science Symposium on Saturday 17th, 2016. More than 60 students representing institutions from Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire attended the event, which [...]

The Brandeis University Division of Science held its annual undergraduate research poster session SciFest VI on August 4, 2016, as a record number of student researchers presented posters with the results of their summer’s (or last year’s) worth of independent research. We had a great audience of gr [...]

The Brandeis University Division of Science held its annual undergraduate research poster session SciFest VI on August 4, 2016, as a record number of student researchers presented posters with the results of their summer’s (or last year’s) worth of independent research. We had a great audience of gr [...]

by James Morris Happy New Year! We just completed another cycle around the sun and counted down to another new year. This got me thinking about the surprisingly difficult task of counting. Counting seems simple. What can be easier than counting a number of items? Children as young as two years old c [...]

by James Morris Vegetables from Russo’s in Watertown, Massachusetts What do cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi all have in common? Sure, they are all vegetables. Yes, your parents probably made you eat them when you were a child. But there’s something more. What the [...]

by James Morris Illustrations by Talia Niederman What’s a vertebrate? That’s easy – A vertebrate is an animal with a backbone. Not so fast. It turns out that not all vertebrates have a backbone. That is, they don’t have the bones that make up the backbone, called vertebrae. Hagfish, for example, don [...]

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